CogAT® – Figure Classification – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at the three pictures. Find the picture that belongs with them. Fill in the bubble under the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample9

The correct answer is B.

Look at what the first 3 shapes have in common. The shapes shown all have 4 sides. The shape that belongs with them should also have 4 sides. A shape with 4 sides is called a quadrilateral.

Answer choice A has 5 sides. This is called a pentagon.
Answer choice B has 4 sides. This is called a quadrilateral.
Answer choice C has 1 curved side. This is called a circle.

Only answer choice B is the only choice that has 4 sides.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Paper Folding – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at the pictures that show a piece of paper being folded. Find the picture that shows what the paper will look like after it is unfolded.

Sample Question:

The correct answer is C.

It may be most beneficial to you and your child to take a square sheet of paper and follow the steps to get the result.

First, the paper is folded in half vertically.
Then, a hole is punched near the bottom.

The hole is punched through two layers of paper, so when the paper is unfolded, there should be two holes.

Answer choice B can be eliminated since it has four holes.
Answer choice A can be eliminated since the holes are too high on the paper.

Only answer choice C shows what the paper looks like when it is unfolded.

This section contains 10 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Figure Matrices – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at the analogy matrix. Find the shape that best fits in the empty square. Fill in the bubble below the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample7

The correct answer is B.

The top row shows a large square on the left and a small square on the right.
The bottom row should have the same relationship between the left and right sides.

The bottom row shows a large circle on the left, so there should be a small circle on the right..

Answer choice A shows a small square.
Answer choice B shows a small circle.
Answer choice C shows a large circle.

Only answer choice B shows a small circle.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Number Series – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at the series shown on the abacus. Find the picture that shows the number of beads in the missing spot. Fill in the bubble under the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample6

The correct answer is A.

The first column has 1 bead.
The second column has 2 beads.
The third column has 3 beads.
The fourth column has 4 beads.
The fifth column has 5 beads.
The sixth column has 6 beads.

Each column on the abacus shows 1 more than the column before it.

The seventh column should have 6 + 1 = 7 beads.

Answer choice A has 7 beads.
Answer choice B has 5 beads.
Answer choice C has 3 beads.

Answer choice A has the right number of beads to complete the pattern.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Number Puzzles – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at pictures of the trains. Find the train car that will make both trains have an equal number of dots. Fill in the bubble under the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The correct answer is C.

The train on the left has 2 dots. The train on the right has 1 dot.

How many more dots does the empty train car need to make a total of 2 dots?

Answer choice A has 3 dots. This will make 1 + 3 = 4 dots. This is too many.
Answer choice B has 2 dots. This will make 1 + 2 = 3 dots. This is too many.
Answer choice C has 1 dot. This will make 1 + 1 = 2 dots. This is just right.

Answer choice C has the right number of dots to make both trains equal.

This section contains 10 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

 

CogAT® – Number Analogies – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at the analogy matrix. Find the picture that best fits in the empty square to show how the amounts relate to each other. Fill in the bubble below the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample4

The correct answer is B.

The top row shows 5 blue fish on the left, then 6 blue fish on the right. Six is 1 more than five. The bottom row should have the same relationship between the left and right sides.

The bottom row shows 5 red fish on the left, then should show 5 + 1 = 6 red fish on the right.

Answer choice A shows 5 red fish.
Answer choice B shows 6 red fish
Answer choice C shows 4 red fish.

Only answer choice B shows 6 red fish.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Picture Classification – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Look at the three pictures on top. Find the picture below that belongs with them. Fill in the bubble under the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample3

The correct answer is A.

The top row shows a watermelon slice, an apple, and a pear. Think about all the ways these pictures are the same. They are all food. They are all fruits.

All of the answer choices are food, so now find the food that has the most in common with the top row.

Answer choice A is a banana, which is a fruit.
Answer choice B is a piece of broccoli, which is a vegetable.
Answer choice C is a wedge of cheese, which is a dairy product.

Only answer choice A is a food that is a fruit.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Sentence Completion – Sample Question

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Instructions:
Your teacher or administrator will read the question to you. LISTEN carefully, and find the picture that answers the question. Fill in the bubble below the correct picture.

Sample Question:  Which one flies in the sky?
CogAT-Sample2

 

 

 

 

 

The correct answer is C.

Answer choice A shows a train, which travels on tracks on the land.
Answer choice B shows a sailboat, which floats on the water.
Answer choice C shows an airplane, which flies in the sky.

Only answer choice C shows something that flies in the sky.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

CogAT® – Picture Analogies – Sample Question

Featured

Instructions:
Look at the analogy matrix. Find the picture that best fits in the empty square to show how the pictures relate to each other. Fill in the bubble below the correct picture.

Sample Question:
CogAT-Sample1

The correct answer is B.

The top row shows the body part, a head, and the clothing item is a hat, which you wear on your head.
The bottom row shows the body part, a leg, and the missing clothing item should be something that you wear on your legs.

Answer choice A shows a shirt, which you wear on your chest.
Answer choice B shows a pair of jeans, which you wear on your legs.
Answer choice C shows a jacket, which you wear on your arms and shoulders.

Only answer choice B shows a clothing item you wear on your legs.

This section contains 14 questions. When your student takes the test at school, there may be 1 or 2 sample questions that are being tested for future use on the CogAT®, Form 7. These questions will not affect your child’s score.

This section is expected to be completed in approximately 30 minutes or less.

Apr 16

Plant a Garden

gardentoolsSpring is a great time to start planting a garden. Gardening is also a great way to celebrate Earth Day, which is April 22. Whether you choose a flower garden, an herb garden, or a vegetable garden – it’s completely up to your personal preferences.

For our garden, we chose three veggies and two herbs. Home Depot is having a Spring sale right now, so we got all our supplies at great low prices.

Your child will love helping you. I am no expert gardener, so we’ll see how this turns out. We had fun though. First we got to pull out all the grass from the area in our yard where we put our box. Our box has an open bottom, so the roots will have plenty of room to grow down. We stirred up the dirt a little, and we found so many fun things there! You can talk with your kids about everything you find. We found bugs, rocks, snail shells, and even a live worm!

As you plant your garden, you can talk about the parts of the plants – roots, stem, leaves, petals, fruit, etc. Don’t forget to talk about what plants need to grow: dirt, water, sunlight.

There are tons of resources online that can help you plan a garden with information about what grows well together, how much water and sunlight different plants need, and so much more.

Good luck!

Apr 16

Raindrop Addition

If you have introduced addition at this point, it is still a new concept. Addition with sums up to 5 is the best starting point because kids can use their fingers. From there, progress to sums up to 10. This worksheet covers sums beyond 10. Students can no longer count on their fingers. This worksheet includes pictures that the kids can count. You can also use counters, beads, or any other object to help your child visualize.

Another method to try is to ‘make tens’. For example, to add 5 + 6: the student likely already knows that 5 + 5 = 10. So since 6 is 1 more than 5, the student can add 1 more to 10 to get 11.

Download Raindrop Addition now.

Download Raindrop Addition now

Mar 03

Vocabulary List 3/2/2015

Each week we’re going to start working on vocabulary and spelling lists. The lists will be short – 5 to 10 words maximum.

Day 1: Introduce the list of words. We did this by writing them on a lined dry erase board.

Day 2: We talked about the definition of each word.

Day 3: We wrote sentences using the words. We used lined handwriting paper. You could also have your student type sentences if you prefer to practice keyboarding skills.

Day 4: Vocabulary quiz time! Give your student the definition, and have him or her either write or say the word. If you’re doing an oral quiz, you could give the word and have your student reply with the definition.

Day 5: Spelling quiz time! You could either give the word or definition and have your student spell the word.

This week’s list is based on money:

  1. bank
  2. money
  3. coin
  4. penny
  5. nickel
  6. dime
  7. quarter
  8. dollar

A bank is a place where you can save your money. There are lots of kinds of coins. A penny is worth 1 cent. A nickel is worth 5 cents. A dime is worth 10 cents. A quarter is worth 25 cents. A dollar is 100 cents.

Mar 01

Keeping Kids Engaged

Are you ever at a loss for what to do with your kids when they’re at home for an extended period of time? We just had to deal with that this past week – between two sick kids and snow and ice with school closing – we’ve been cooped up in the house for a whole week. With Spring Break around the corner, we have another week of potential boredom coming up.

Spring Break

A lot of places offer spring break camps. Think about your child’s interests and see what is available in your area. Some options in our area are sports camps, science camps, and art camps. Some of these places offer camps by the day or a discount if you sign up for the whole week.

If you have good weather, you could enjoy some outdoor adventures – take a hike, visit the zoo, go to the arboretum, or check out a nature preserve.

If the weather is gloomy, try some indoor museums. Many cities now have hands-on children’s museums. You could visit an aquarium or set up play dates with friends.

Stuck in the House?

It may seem boring being stuck at home, but there is so much to do! That closet full of toys is a good start. If you want to sleep in, leave some toys out or where your child can reach. Let the kids play for an hour or so while you get in some extra snooze time.

After breakfast, keep your kids at the table for some arts and crafts or worksheets. My son’s favorite worksheets right now are word searches. We have several available for subscribers. For kids who can’t write yet, coloring or tracing pages are perfect. They can practice their fine motor skills while having fun. Our go-to activity for arts and crafts is painting. For my youngest, I use paint-with-water. It’s less messy, but she still gets to ‘paint’. My oldest uses Crayola watercolors. They love painting. We also do Play-Doh sometimes, but it makes a lot of ‘crumbs’ so have a vacuum handy.

Try some at-home science projects. You can buy kits for almost anything. We are into Snap Circuits right now. It’s a great way to introduce kids to electronics. Follow the instructions in the book at first, and then try experimenting and creating your own circuits. You can try one of our fun science projects too!

Clean out a closet for some productive fun. You might even some hidden gems that were lost in the back of the closet. Label boxes for toys or clothes to donate, to sell, or to give to a friend. As a reward for your child helping you, you can offer him or her a new toy for cleaning out the old ones.

Cook together. Kids love doing whatever you’re doing. Bake some cookies or a cake, or even just let your child help you prepare dinner. You can talk about measuring out the ingredients.

Feb 23

Vocabulary List 2/23/15

Each week we’re going to start working on vocabulary and spelling lists. The lists will be short – 5 to 10 words maximum.

Day 1: Introduce the list of words. We did this by writing them on a lined dry erase board.

Day 2: We talked about the definition of each word.

Day 3: We wrote sentences using the words. We used lined handwriting paper. You could also have your student type sentences if you prefer to practice keyboarding skills.

Day 4: Vocabulary quiz time! Give your student the definition, and have him or her either write or say the word. If you’re doing an oral quiz, you could give the word and have your student reply with the definition.

Day 5: Spelling quiz time! You could either give the word or definition and have your student spell the word.

This week’s list is based on air travel:

  1. airplane
  2. airport
  3. helicopter
  4. luggage
  5. pilot

For the sentences on Day 3, you could either have your student come up with sentences on his or her own, or you could give the sentences. Either way, we try to write sentences that explain the definitions. Here’s what we came up with for this list:

An airplane takes people between cities in the air. It comes and goes from an airport. A helicopter is another way to travel in the air. People pack their clothes in luggage to carry them on an airplane. A pilot flies an airplane.

Feb 17

Word Search Fun

I made these word searches for my son’s class at school. These are great for any ability preschool student. There are seven word searches included in this packet:

  1. Color words (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple)
  2. Color words given the color instead of the word (same colors)
  3. Key words A-F (apple, ball, cat, dog, elephant, fish)
  4. Key words G-L (gum, hat, igloo, jet, kite, lion)
  5. Key words M-R (mouse, nest, octopus, pig, quilt, rabbit)
  6. Key words S-Z (sun, tiger, umbrella, van, web, x-ray, yarn, zebra)
  7. Number words (zero through ten)

Have fun!

Download Preschool Word Searches now

Download Preschool Word Searches now

Feb 16

Vocabulary List 2/16/2015

Each week we’re going to start working on vocabulary and spelling lists. The lists will be short – 5 to 10 words maximum.

Day 1: Introduce the list of words. We did this by writing them on a lined dry erase board.

Day 2: We talked about the definition of each word.

Day 3: We wrote sentences using the words. We used lined handwriting paper. You could also have your student type sentences if you prefer to practice keyboarding skills.

Day 4: Vocabulary quiz time! Give your student the definition, and have him or her either write or say the word. If you’re doing an oral quiz, you could give the word and have your student reply with the definition.

Day 5: Spelling quiz time! You could either give the word or definition and have your student spell the word.

This week’s list is based on words from the story “The Little Red Hen”.

  1. baking
  2. bread
  3. flour
  4. grain
  5. harvest
  6. little
  7. wheat

For the sentences on Day 3, you could either have your student come up with sentences on his or her own, or you could give the sentences. Either way, we try to write sentences that explain the definitions. Here’s what we came up with for this list:

The little red hen is small. She plants the grain. It grows into wheat that looks like grass. It is time to harvest the wheat when it is done growing. She uses the wheat to make flour that is used for baking bread.

Feb 11

Volcano

This week at school, my son has been studying the letter V. So we decided to make a volcano. It’s pretty simple, even for the less-than-crafty person.

Materials Needed:

  • Air-dry clay
  • Paint (we used two different shades of brown)
  • Paint brush(es)
  • Empty can or other container to use as the “magma chamber”
  • Wax Paper
  • Tray or baking sheet

For the eruption, you will need:

  • 1 cup of vinegar
  • red food coloring
  • 1 tablespoon of dish soap
  • 1-2 tablespoons of baking soda
  • a few squares of toilet paper or a paper towel
  • 1 rubberband

To make the volcano:

  1. Place your wax paper on your tray or baking sheet. You can tape the wax paper down if you want to make sure it doesn’t move around.
  2. Place your empty can in the center of the tray.
  3. Mold your clay into a volcano shape around the can. Don’t completely enclose the can because you have to put your reactants in there. It’s okay if it’s lumpy looking because mountains and volcanoes are not perfectly smooth in real life.
  4. Let it dry according to the instructions on the clay package. The clay we used said to let it dry for 24 hours. We got impatient and waited about 17 hours before painting.
  5. Paint the volcano. We used shades of brown, but you may be more artistic than we are.
  6. Let the paint dry, then you’re ready for an eruption!

IMG_3873To create the eruption:

  1. Mix 1 cup of vinegar with food coloring and 1 tablespoon of dish soap. We used about 10 drops of food coloring, and our eruption was pink. You could try more drops for a redder eruption.
  2. Pour the mixture into the magma chamber (the can inside your volcano).
  3. Wrap the baking soda in the toilet paper or paper towel. Roll it up and hold it closed with the rubber band.
  4. Drop your baking soda package into the magma chamber, and wait for the reaction.

 

Jan 31

Valentine’s Activities

ValentinePacketIncluded in this packet are five Valentine’s-themed activities for a variety of ability levels:

  1. Addition Fact Families – students write two addition equations given a set of three numbers
  2. Valentine’s Word Search – easy difficulty level, so this would be appropriate for a wider range of students
  3. Read About Your Heart – a short reading passage about the human heart with a few comprehension questions at the end
  4. Valentine Sudoku – a hands-on version of Sudoku using candy hearts (or other candy) – medium difficulty level
  5. Valentine Maze – easy difficulty level, so this would be appropriate for a wider range of students

 

Download Valentine Activities now

Download Valentine Activities now